futurescope:

Robot restaurant where machines cook and serve food to customers

A restaurant in Kunshan, China, employed a team of 15 androids to cook and deliver food. The cute side of the Robocalypse. 

The restaurant has a total of 15 robots in heights of 1.2 meters. Each robot costs 40,000 yuan (6500 US dollars).

As doormen, cooks and waiters, the robots can work continuously for eleven hours after a night charge, and are able to use 40 basic language expressions, such as welcoming sentences to customers.

Singular instance? Nope. There is another restaurant in Harbin, China with 18 robot workers and a fully automated japanese sushi restaurant.

[read more] [photo credit AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE]

(via scienceyoucanlove)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Gabriele Galimberti

Delicatessen with Love

1. Jenya Shalikashuili, 58 years old – Alaverdi, Armenia. – Tolma (roll of beef and rice wrapped into grape leaves)

2. Marisa Batini, 80 years old – Castiglion Fiorentino, Italy. Swiss chard and ricotta Ravioli with meat sauce 

3. Serette Charles, 63 years old – Saint-Jean du Sud, Haiti. Lambi in creole sauce. 

4. Maria Luz Fedric, 53 years old – Cayman Islands. Honduran Iguana with rice and beans.

5. Wadad Achi, 66 years old – Beirut, Lebanon. Mjadara (rice and lentils cream)

6. Regina Lifumbo, 53 years old – Mchinji, Malawi. Finkubala (Caterpillar in tomato sauce)

7. Inara Runtule, 68 years old – Kekava, Latvia. Silke €“ (herring with potatoes and cottage cheese) 

8. Ana Lucia Souza Pascoal, 53 years old – €“ Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Fejoada light.

9. Brigitta Fransson, 70 years old – Stockholm, Sweden. Inkokt Lax – (poached cold salmon and vegetables)

10. Julia Enaigua, 71 years old – La Paz, Bolivia. Queso Humacha (vegetables and fresh cheese soup)

Recipes on artist site

fuckyeahillustrativeart:

Caitlyn Kurilich | Website | Tumblr

fuckyeahillustrativeart:

Caitlyn Kurilich | Website | Tumblr

cross-connect:

Dessi Terzieva is a Detroit-based 22-year-old law student who “maintains her sanity through her art”. So in between her Civil Procedure and Constitutional Law classes, she whips out these beautiful, thoughtfully-constructed collages.

In the process of cutting pictures from old books and magazines, I get to know my characters and their story, ultimately to make them my own

By giving them a new reality, they give me a voice. Each collage is the equivalent of a diary entry. I am speaking to you and others, telling you how I feel, what I think, what I crave, and what I despise via

Check out her tumblr

                                           :-)

thingsorganizedneatly:

cavetocanvas:

Damien Hirst, The Tears of Jesus, 2003-2005

editor’s note: A lot of you may not know this, but I have another blog called LOOSETIGER. For the record—Austin Radcliffe’s other blog, loose tiger. It’s pretty good too.

thingsorganizedneatly:

cavetocanvas:

Damien Hirst, The Tears of Jesus, 2003-2005

editor’s note: A lot of you may not know this, but I have another blog called LOOSETIGER. For the record—Austin Radcliffe’s other blog, loose tiger. It’s pretty good too.

findmomo:

“All in the downs the fleet was moored, banners waving in the wind. When Black-eyed Susan came aboard, and eyed the burly men. ‘Tell me ye sailors, tell me true, if my Sweet William sails with you.’”

findmomo:

“All in the downs the fleet was moored, banners waving in the wind. When Black-eyed Susan came aboard, and eyed the burly men. ‘Tell me ye sailors, tell me true, if my Sweet William sails with you.’”

livelymorgue:

In 1955, Easter fell on April 10, and in the day’s paper a stand-alone photo — taken on Good Friday — showed Torrance Helen watering lilies on the 64th floor of the RCA Building (30 Rockefeller Plaza). The picture ran near a mention of an egg-rolling event in Central Park that drew 1,500 children to push eggs across the Great Lawn, and a prediction of 70 degree weather on Sunday. The story provided a variety of other Easter observations, including one for Sing Sing’s 1,450 prisoners, who would “get an opportunity to attend Easter services in chapels bedecked with plants and flowers, enjoy a special dinner and see the movie, ‘Gone With the Wind.’ ” Photo:

aseaofquotes:

Paul Auster, Winter Journal

aseaofquotes:

Paul Auster, Winter Journal

littlelimpstiff14u2:

These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.

This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.

Image credits: Takao Tsushima

(via airtote)